Ultrafast Processor Uses Light For Transmitting Data

0
595
Advertisement

A team of engineers has successfully demoed the first processor that uses light for ultrafast communications. This research could be used in applications such as LIDAR, the light radar technology used to guide self-driving vehicles, brain ultrasound imaging and new environmental biosensors.

Engineers have successfully paired electrons and photons within a single-chip microprocessor, a landmark development that opens the door to ultrafast, low-power data crunching. The new chip marks the next step in the evolution of fiber optic communication technology by integrating into a microprocessor the photonic interconnects, or inputs and outputs (I/O), needed to talk to other chips.

The researchers packed two processor cores with more than 70 million transistors and 850 photonic components onto a 3-by-6-millimeter chip. They fabricated the microprocessor in a foundry that mass-produces high-performance computer chips, proving that their design can be easily and quickly scaled up for commercial production.

Advertisement

“This is a milestone. It’s the first processor that can use light to communicate with the external world,” said Vladimir Stojanović from the University of California, who led the development of the chip. “No other processor has the photonic I/O in the chip.”

“This is the first time we’ve put a system together at such scale, and have it actually do something useful, like run a program,” said Asanović, who helped develop the free and open architecture called RISC-V (reduced instruction set computer), used by the processor.

Compared with electrical wires, fiber optics support greater bandwidth, carrying more data at higher speeds over greater distances with less energy. While advances in optical communication technology have dramatically improved data transfers between computers, bringing photonics into the computer chips themselves had been difficult.

READ
Free 3D Model Design Tool Saves Design Time & Money

That’s because no one until now had figured out how to integrate photonic devices into the same complex and expensive fabrication processes used to produce computer chips without changing the process itself. Doing so is the key, since it does not further increase the cost of the manufacturing or risk failure of the fabricated transistors.

The researchers verified the functionality of the chip with the photonic interconnects by using it to run various computer programs, requiring it to send and receive instructions and data to and from memory. They showed that the chip had a bandwidth density of 300 gigabits per second per square millimeter, about 10 to 50 times greater than packaged electrical-only microprocessors currently on the market.

The photonic I/O on the chip is also energy-efficient, using only 1.3 picojoules per bit, equivalent to consuming 1.3 watts of power to transmit a terabit of data per second. In the experiments, the data was sent to a receiver 10 meters away and back.

“The advantage with optical is that with the same amount of power, you can go a few centimeters, a few meters or a few kilometers,” said Chen Sun. “For high-speed electrical links, 1 meter is about the limit before you need repeaters to regenerate the electrical signal, and that quickly increases the amount of power needed. For an electrical signal to travel 1 kilometer, you’d need thousands of picojoules for each bit.”

The achievement opens the door to a new era of bandwidth-hungry applications. One near-term application for this technology is to make data centers more green. According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, data centers consumed about 91 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in 2013, about 2 percent of the total electricity consumed in the United States, and the need for power is growing exponentially.

Advertisement

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS & COMMENTS

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Are you human? *