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Sensor Expo California: Printed Polymer Sensors The Next Big Change In IoT Technology

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Sensor Expo California: Printed Polymer Sensors The Next Big Change In IoT Technology

According to a press release, Hoffmann+Krippner demonstrated how sensors based on printed polymer pastes can be accurate enough for IoT position or pressure sensors at Sensors Expo, in California. The sensor materials called SensoInk can be printed as potentiometers, resistors, switches or keyboard contacts on circuit boards or electronic components.

In reference to the demonstration made by Hoffmann+Krippner, “Only two components are required for signal transformation; a printed potentiometer track on a carrier material (e.g. FR4 or PET foil) and a conductive wiper. The firm also has a membrane position sensor called Sensofoil, which is a thin-film membrane 0.5mm to 1mm thick. It is available in lengths of 50mm up to 500mm, 40mm wide rotary. The supplier claims a repeat accuracy of 1mm to 10µm.”

Jens Kautzor, CEO of Germany-based Hoffman+Krippner states, “An electronic evaluation of the initial state must be conducted to detect how the state of the Internet-connected thing changes. With our sensors, you can accurately measure changes, detect positions, or count objects.”

In a similar event another firm, Thin Film Electronics also demonstrated a printed sensor for tagging bottles which can detect when a product is ‘sealed’ and ‘opened.’ This can likely be used for tagging wine and spirits, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and automotive fluids; the tag is designed to provide NFC-readability before and after a factory seal on the product has been broken.

According to the published media, news Cambridge-based PragmatIC, which recently received a cash injection from investors such as ARM and CIC, said it has plans to broaden its circuit design activities, including applications such as sensors, processors and wireless communications. It has a production facility based at the National Centre for Printable Electronics in Sedgefield, is using the funds to hire more staff and scale-up its production capacity to 100 million flexible integrated circuits by end of this year, as mentioned in the release.

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